Selection of Deep-Fried Fish and Shellfish Cooking Recipe – Fried Mozzarella Sandwich Cooking Recipe

Selection of Deep-Fried Fish and Shellfish Cooking Recipe - Fried Mozzarella Sandwich Cooking Recipe

Selection of Deep-Fried Fish and Shellfish Cooking Recipe – Fritto Misto di Mare Recipe

Deep-fried fish is the most commonly found fried food in Italy, appearing on almost every restaurant menu. This dish can consist of just shellfish and mollusks (calamari and shrimp), or fish, known as “paranza,” or a mixture of the two.

Serves 6

  • Preparation time: 30 minutes
  • Frying time: 12 minutes

Ingredients

  • 1 ½ lb. (800 g) fish for frying (mullet, dabs, small mackerel, anchovy, etc.)
  • 6 oz. (200 g) shrimp
  • 6 oz. (200 g) calamari rings
  • 2 tablespoons, approximately, flour or durum-wheat flour
  • Sufficient quantity of olive oil or peanut oil for deep frying
  • 1 lemon
  • Salt

Selection of Deep-Fried Fish and Shellfish Cooking Recipe 1

Selection of Deep-Fried Fish and Shellfish Cooking Recipe 2

Cooking Method

  • Wash the fish and shellfish and drain carefully. Dip them in a very small quantity of flour (1, 2).
  • Shake them to eliminate the surplus and fry them in the oil at 350°F/180°C until they are well browned (2 minutes for shrimp, 4 minutes for the calamari and other small fish) (3). Drain on paper towel and sprinkle with salt (4).
  • Serve immediately with lemon wedges.

Chefs notes

  • For a lighter result, use a minimal amount of flour. Put the ingredients in a bag with 1 tablespoon of flour, close the bag and shake. You can also shake the ingredients in a tamis or drum sieve, once they are floured, to remove any excess flour. The flour is only used to eliminate any trace of moisture on the surface of the ingredients.
  • You can sprinkle the fried foods with chopped parsley before serving.
  • You can also add scampi, small squid or cuttlefish, whole octopus (moscardini), and soft-shell crab.

Fried Mozzarella Sandwich Cooking Recipe – Mozzarella in Carrozza Recipe

“Mozzarella in a carriage” is a Neapolitan dish created to use up mozzarella that is no longer completely fresh or moist.

Serves 4

  • Preparation time: 30 minutes
  • Resting time: 1 hour
  • Frying time: 5 minutes

Ingredients

  • 8 oz. (250 g) mozzarella
  • 8 slices soft white bread
  • 2 eggs
  • 2/3 cup (150 ml) milk
  • 3 tablespoons flour
  • Sufficient quantity of olive oil or peanut oil for deep frying
  • Salt

Selection of Deep-Fried Fish and Shellfish Cooking Recipe 3

Selection of Deep-Fried Fish and Shellfish Cooking Recipe 4

Cooking Method

  • Drain the mozzarella and leave it exposed to air, uncovered, for 1 hour.
  • Cut it into four slices approximately V2 in. (1 cm) thick. Remove the crusts from the bread. Place the slices of cheese on half of the bread.
  • Cover with the remaining slices of bread and press down well before moistening the edges with water and flouring them to form a seal. This will prevent the mozzarella escaping during the frying process.
  • Beat the eggs with the milk. Dip each sandwich into the beaten egg, allowing them to soak up as much egg as possible (1). Let rest for a few minutes then fry in the oil at 350°F/180°C until they are well browned (2) (approximately 5 minutes).
  • Drain on paper towel and sprinkle with salt (3). Serve immediately.

Chef’s notes

  • You can replace the soft white bread by one- or two-day-old slices from a rustic loaf. Add a fillet of anchovy in oil to the cheese.
  • Fried, breaded mozzarella is prepared by frying the slices of cheese dipped in egg and bread crumbs. They are then sprinkled with salt and oregano.

Deep-Fried Foods – Selection of Deep-Fried Meats and Vegetables Cooking Recipe

Deep-Fried Foods - Selection of Deep-Fried Meats and Vegetables Cooking Recipe

Deep-Fried Foods

Italy has a range of traditional recipes for deep-fried foods, the components varying from one region to another. The use of certain ingredients such as meat, fish, and vegetables remains constant. There are also many recipes for deep-fried bread and pizza, as well as for sweet fritters.

Advice on preparing deep-fried foods

Different frying oils

Use an oil that will not exceed the critical temperature of its smoking point to avoid breaking down the fat molecules (pyrolysis). This phenomenon produces bad odors and transmits an unpleasant taste to foods, generating toxic substances.

Oils rich in polyunsaturated fats, which are unstable and become carcinogenic at high temperature, should therefore be avoided. In some countries, you are strongly advised not to use these oils for frying, especially sunflower oil.

The smoking point is therefore of fundamental importance when choosing a frying oil. It is different for each oil.

Olive oil is the most stable, containing natural antioxidants and only 10 percent polyunsaturated fats. It has a smoking point of 410°F/210°C. However, its flavor can be too pronounced for some foods and it has the disadvantage of being expensive.

The smoking point of sunflower oil is below 266°F/130°C (65 percent polyunsaturated fats); corn oil’s smoking point is320°F/160°C (60 per-cent polyunsaturated fats), and for peanut oil it is 356°F/180°C (30 per-cent polyunsaturated fats). There are also oils called “frying” oils that are processed to remain stable at a high temperature, in particular refined palm oil (464°F/240°C), which is widely used in the restaurant trade, and modified vegetable oil, generally composed of sunflower oil with fractionated vegetable oil added.

Lard is also very stable for frying (500°F/260°C) and therefore widely used(especially for patisserie).

Depending on the products to be fried, olive oil and peanut oil remain the best choice for domestic use. Clarified butter is an alternative.

Advice on more healthful ways of frying

Ideally, for health reasons, the oil in a fryer should be changed every time food is fried, or at least every other time.

Filter the oil after frying to eliminate the debris that might carbonize next time it is used (the oil used to cook fries will keep longer than oil used for frying foods coated in batter).

Keep the oil in a cool, dark place in a sealed container to prevent oxidation. Do not keep longer than 2 to 3 weeks.

To prevent the oil burning, always use in large quantities (at least three times the volume of the foods to be fried) and, once it has reached the desired temperature, do not hold it there for long with nothing cooking in it, just add a piece of bread if necessary. The temperature when frying at home should never exceed 3S0°F/180°C. There are several signs that indicate that frying oil is deteriorating: a dark color, an unpleasant smell and taste, smoking, persistent surface foam, and increased viscosity, all resulting in greasy food that does not drain well.

Temperatures for frying different categories of foods

The smaller the item of food to be fried, the higher the frying temperature needs to be.

Depending on the food, it varies between 280°F/140°C and 350°F/180°C. If the temperature is not high enough, the moisture in the food does not evaporate and the result will not be crisp. To achieve a good, crisp, non-greasy result, cook as few items as possible at the same time. The temperature chosen must remain constant. 350°F/180°C: small pieces of vegetables or fish, precooked foods, shrimp, offal, frozen foods;

320°F/160°C to 340°F/170°C: breaded meat and fish, cakes, vegetables; 300°F/150°C: large portions of chicken or rabbit, whole fish, and all foods that require a longer cooking time.

How to prepare the foods to be fried

The food should be dry and at room temperature before being fried. Avoid adding salt or spices as this can accelerate the deterioration of the oil and affect the adherence of any coating to the food. Once the food is drained, place immediately on paper towel, and do not cover. Serve immediately. You can keep the food that has been fried first in a warm oven with the door left open while you fry the remainder.

What equipment is needed?

An electric fryer is ideal for precise temperature control.
A large pan fitted with a basket also works well. To drain the fried food, it is best to use a slotted spoon that will not retain the oil as a sieve might. In the absence of an electric fryer, you can use an immersion or infrared thermometer.

How to avoid bad smells

Add apple slices, sprigs of fresh parsley, or coriander seeds to the frying oil, and change them regularly. This will diminish the odors.

Frying time

The time different foods take to cook depends on the nature and size of what you are frying. In general the food is ready when it turns a nice golden color and rises to the surface.

Selection of Deep-Fried Meats and Vegetables Cooking Recipe – Fritto Misto di Terra Recipe

A mixed selection of deep-fried meats and vegetables is a traditional Piedmontese dish, prepared with a wide choice of foods “of the earth”: meats, vegetables, and cakes. Similar versions are Bolognese fritto misto, with an even richer selection (cold meats, fruit, acacia flowers, etc.); Roman, with a more limited selection (mainly offal and artichokes); Milanese, based on boiled meats; and Ligurian, mainly composed of vegetables and fish.

Serves 6

  • Preparation time: 1 hour
  • Frying time: 25 minutes
  • Cooling time for the semolina: 1-2 hours

Ingredients

  • 1 2/3 cups (400 ml) milk
  • Zest of 1 lemon
  • 2/3 cup (6 oz./160 g) sugar
  • 1 cup (3 ½ oz./100 g) fine semolina
  • 1 lb. (500 g) mixed vegetables (eggplant, zucchini, zucchini flowers, mushrooms, artichokes, cabbage, and broccoli)
  • 1 lb. (500 g) assorted meat (veal sweetbreads, brains, veal escalope, calf’s liver, sausages, poultry drumsticks, pork chops and spare ribs, lamb chops, and frogs’ legs)
  • 6 soft amaretti biscuits
  • 1 apple, sliced
  • 4 eggs
  • 4 cups (8 oz./250 g) fresh bread crumbs
  • Sufficient quantity of olive oil or peanut oil for deep frying
  • Salt

Deep-Fried Foods - Selection of Deep-Fried Meats and Vegetables Cooking Recipe 1

Deep-Fried Foods - Selection of Deep-Fried Meats and Vegetables Cooking Recipe 2

Cooking Method

Prepare the semolina

  • Bring the milk to a boil with the lemon zest and sugar. Pour in the semolina all at once (1), whisking continuously.
  • Cook for a few minutes (2), then pour onto a flat surface or polenta board (3). Let cool, then cut into diamond-shaped lozenges.

Clean and cut up the vegetables.

  • Cut the meat into evenly sized pieces.
  • Dip all the ingredients, including the lozenges of semolina, amaretti biscuits, and pieces of apple into the beaten eggs (4), and then the bread crumbs (5).
  • Fry them in the oil at 330°F/165°C until they are golden brown (8 to 12 minutes for the meat, 3 minutes for vegetables, 2 minutes for the amaretti) (6).
  • Drain on paper towel and sprinkle with salt.
  • Serve immediately.

Chef’s note

  • To make a lighter coating, use beaten egg whites instead of whole eggs.

Chestnut Flour Polenta Cooking Recipe – Baked Polenta Cooking Recipe

Chestnut Flour Polenta Cooking Recipe - Baked Polenta Cooking Recipe

Chestnut Flour Polenta Cooking Recipe – Polenta Alla Farina di Castagne Recipe

Serves 4-6

  • Preparation time: 10 minutes
  • Cooking time: 30 minutes

Ingredients

  • 4 cups (1 liter) water
  • 1 tablespoon (15 g) salt
  • 1 tablespoon olive oil
  • 3 cups (10 oz./300 g) chestnut flour

Chestnut Flour Polenta Cooking Recipe - Baked Polenta Cooking Recipe 1

Chestnut Flour Polenta Cooking Recipe - Baked Polenta Cooking Recipe 2

Cooking Method

  • Boil the water in a saucepan. Add the salt and olive oil, then pour in the flour, mixing continuously with a whisk to prevent lumps forming (1).
  • Let simmer for about 30 minutes, stirring continuously (after the initial phase the whisk can be replaced by a wooden spoon) (2).
  • At the end of the cooking time, stir vigorously (3), and immediately pour onto a polenta board to firm up. Accompany with soft cheese, charcuterie, sausages, herrings, or a meat- or mushroom-based sauce.

Different Ways to Serve Polenta

Soft polenta is usually served directly from the saucepan onto plates with a sauce to accompany it.

Polenta prepared/or dishes requiring a firmer texture is poured onto a polenta board, spread out, and left to firm up (allow approximately 30 minutes). It can then be cut into Vi in. to 1 in. (1 to 2 cm) slices, which can be served immediately or cooked a second time.

Broiled or grilled polenta (grigliata) (1)
Place the slices of polenta under a broiler or on a lightly oiled, preheated ribbed grill pan. Cook for 2 minutes on each side until well browned.

Baked polenta (al forno)
Place the slices of polenta on a sheet of parchment paper on a baking sheet. Bake at 450°F (250°C) until well browned (approximately 5 minutes).

Fried polenta (fritta) (2)
Fry the slices of polenta in oil heated to 350°F/180°C.The slices are cooked as soon as they are well browned. Drain on paper towel. You can make polenta “fries” by cutting it into sticks rather than slices.

Polenta gnocchi (gnocchi di polenta)
Immerse the polenta cut into dice in salted boiling water. As soon as the dice rise to the surface, drain them, and add butter and grated cheese (Parmesan or firmly set ricotta).

Suggested accompaniments

Shrimp (Friuli style): Top soft polenta with shrimp sauteed in butter with garlic, parsley, and button mushrooms.

Sausage (Roman style): soften onions with olive oil, chopped garlic, and parsley in a saucepan, then add the sausages and brown them. Deglaze with white wine and add tomato sauce. Cook for 15 minutes. Serve on soft polenta on warmed plates and sprinkle with grated pecorino.

Pancetta lardons: create alternate layers of soft polenta, cheese, and bacon, lightly fried in a skillet with butter and sage.

Onion (Trentino style): top grilled polenta with onions softened in a skillet with olive oil and rosemary, seasoned with salt and pepper.

Salt cod (Venetian style): all recipes for preparing salt cod go well with polenta (see stock fish alia Vicentina, p. 249).

Quail polenta (Bergamo style): cook the cleaned quail for 20 minutes in a skillet with butter and sage, serve them with their juices on top of soft polenta served on warm plates. You can also serve the polenta with kebabs of quail.

Beef or wild boar Bolognese sauce (ragu): serve soft polenta on warmed plates topped with the sauce and grated Parmesan.

Gorgonzola (Milanese style): pour half of the cooked polenta onto a polenta board, dot with butter and small cubes of Gorgonzola, cover with the rest of the polenta; cut into portions and serve immediately.

Polenta Como Valley style (uncia): in a serving dish, create alternate layers of soft polenta with grated Parmesan; and onions lightly fried in a skillet with butter and sage.

Cheese polenta (specialty of Oropa in Piedmont and of the Val d’Aosta): after cooking polenta for 30 minutes, add 8 oz. (250 g) cheese (a mixture of Gorgonzola, fontina, and Tomme) cut into small dice. Complete the cooking time and stir in about 1 stick (4 oz./115 g) of melted butter. Add another 3 V2 oz. (100 g) of cheese and mix in well. Remove from the heat and serve immediately:

Porcini: fry sliced porcini in a skillet with olive oil, garlic, and parsley. Season with salt and pepper and deglaze with white wine. Serve on slices of grilled polenta.

Chestnut Flour Polenta Cooking Recipe - Baked Polenta Cooking Recipe 3

Baked Polenta Cooking Recipe – Polenta Pasticciata Recipe

Serves 8

  • Preparation time: 45 minutes
  • Cooking time: 30 minutes

Ingredients

  • 10 oz. (300 g) ground beef
  • 2 chipolata sausages
  • 1 stick (4 oz./100 g) butter
  • 1 onion
  • 1 carrot
  • 1 stick celery
  • ½ cup (1 oz./30 g) dried porcini (soaked in water for 10 minutes)
  • 3 ½ oz. (100 g) guanciale (cured pork cheek flavored with herbs)
  • 1 cup (250 ml) white wine
  • 1 ½ cups (8 oz./250 g) peeled tomatoes
  • 4 oz. (100 g) raw ham
  • 1 portion polenta cooled on a polenta board
  • 1 ½cups (7 oz./200 g) grated Gruyere
  • 1/3 cup (2 oz./50 g) grated Parmesan
  • Salt

Chestnut Flour Polenta Cooking Recipe - Baked Polenta Cooking Recipe 4

Chestnut Flour Polenta Cooking Recipe - Baked Polenta Cooking Recipe 5

Cooking Method

  • Fry the beef and the chipolatas in a saucepan with half the butter. Wash, peel, and chop all the vegetables except the tomatoes and add them to the pan with the rehydrated porcini and the guanciale.
  • Let soften, then deglaze with the wine. Add the tomatoes and a scant V2 cup (100 ml) water, season with salt, then leave this sauce to simmer for 15 minutes. Cut the ham into strips.
  • In a buttered baking dish, create alternate layers of polenta and sauce (1). Sprinkle each layer with grated Gruyere cheese and ham (2).
  • Finish with a layer of polenta. Sprinkle over Parmesan cheese and dot with the remaining butter (3).
    Bake for 30 minutes at 350°F (180°C).

Chef’s note

  • Another traditional lighter version is to replace the sausage and beef with veal and the livers and hearts from chicken or other poultry.

Did you know?

  • The literal translation of the Italian name of this dish is “messy polenta.”

Chestnut Flour Polenta Cooking Recipe - Baked Polenta Cooking Recipe 6

Quick Polenta Cooking Recipe – Buckwheat Flour Polenta Cooking Recipe

Quick Polenta Cooking Recipe - Buckwheat Flour Polenta Cooking Recipe

Quick Polenta Cooking Recipe – Polenta Rapida Recipe

Serves 4-6

  • Preparation time: 10 minutes
  • Cooking time: 5 minutes

Ingredients

  • 4 cups (1 liter) water
  • 1 tablespoon (15 g) salt
  • 2 ½ cups (10 oz./300 g) precooked polenta flour for firm polenta
    or
  • 1 ½ cups (7 oz./200 g) precooked polenta flour for soft polenta

Quick Polenta Cooking Recipe - Buckwheat Flour Polenta Cooking Recipe 1

Quick Polenta Cooking Recipe - Buckwheat Flour Polenta Cooking Recipe 2

Quick Polenta Cooking Recipe - Buckwheat Flour Polenta Cooking Recipe 3

Cooking Method

  • Boil the water in a saucepan, add the salt, then remove from the heat. Pour in the flour, mixing continuously with a whisk to prevent lumps forming (1).
  • Replace over the heat and cook for a few moments (see the packet instructions), stirring continuously (2).
  • The polenta is cooked once it comes away from the sides of the saucepan. Spread it onto the polenta board and leave to firm up (3). (Yellow polenta flour has been used in these photographs.)

Buckwheat Flour Polenta Cooking Recipe – Polenta Taragna Recipe

Serves 4-6

  • Preparation time: 10 minutes
  • Cooking time: 1 hour

Ingredients

  • 4 cups (1 liter) water
  • 1 tablespoon (15 g) salt
  • 3 cups (10 oz./300 g) buckwheat flour
  • 1 stick (4 oz./100 g) butter
  • 1 ½ cups (6 oz./200 g) cheese: raclette or other quick melting variety (traditionally a cheese from the Valtellina called bitto is used)

Quick Polenta Cooking Recipe - Buckwheat Flour Polenta Cooking Recipe 4

Quick Polenta Cooking Recipe - Buckwheat Flour Polenta Cooking Recipe 5

Cooking Method

  • Boil the water in a saucepan. Add the salt, then pour in the flour, mixing continuously with a whisk to prevent lumps forming (1).
  • Let simmer for 45 to 60 minutes, stirring continuously (after the initial phase the whisk can be replaced by a wooden spoon).
  • Add the butter and the cheese in small pieces and cook for an additional 5 minutes (2, 3). Serve immediately on warmed plates.

Polenta – Traditional Polenta Cooking Recipe

Polenta - Traditional Polenta Cooking Recipe

Polenta

Polenta is a staple of the traditional food of northeast Italy. Originally it was a peasant gruel made from a base of chickpeas, beans, or buckwheat.

Corn arrived in Europe from America in the sixteenth century and lent itself well to this method of preparing food. Both its easy cultivation and its high yield helped to stem famine, particularly in Trentino and Friuli. In these regions it is still called “Grano Turco” (Turkish grain), because corn was imported from Turkey in quantity during the seventeenth century.

Different types of polenta

  • Yellow polenta: prepared with yellow corn flour, this is the classic polenta. It adapts well to all sorts of recipes.
  • White polenta: prepared with white corn flour, this is the finest polenta. It is served with delicate foods such as fish.
  • Taragna polenta: prepared with buckwheat flour. This is more rustic and quite rich. It is accompanied by very simple sauces based on anchovies or cheese.
  • Chickpea or bean polenta: polenta is still prepared from these ingredients in the South of Italy.
  • Chestnut polenta: prepared with chestnut flour, in the Tuscan tradition.

Firm or soft?

There are several ways to prepare polenta: firm or soft, cooked and served immediately, cut into slices and then fried, broiled, or poached. It can also be baked in the oven as a gratin with other ingredients added to it (cheese, butter, tomato sauce, meat, etc.) The different-sized particles of the grain in the polenta flour naturally produce varying results. A fine-grained flour will result in a creamier polenta, but it is more difficult to make without lumps. With a thicker flour, it is easier to avoid lumps, but the polenta will be more rustic.

Polenta prepared with corn flour requires a long cooking time and needs to be stirred continually. These days, it is easy to find pre-cooked polenta flour commercially, which saves a great deal of time (it takes 5 minutes rather than 45 to 60 minutes). The results obtained from such products are perfectly acceptable.

Hardware

Traditionally, polenta is cooked in a wide pan made from beaten copper known as a “paiolo” but you can now find paioli made from cast iron, aluminum with a nonstick lining, or from soapstone. There are even paioli available that have an integral electric whisk. Once cooked, the polenta can be poured onto a wooden board, allowed to cool, and then cut up with a cotton thread or knife. The classic polenta board is round.

Advice on making polenta

  • The quantities of polenta given are for 4 cups (1 liter) of water; however, depending on the type of flour, polenta may require more or less water.
  • Add a tablespoon of olive oil to the water just after adding the flour. This will save you having to stir constantly.
  • For a very fine polenta, you can avoid lumps by pouring the flour into the water before boiling point is reached.
  • For preference, use a coarse-grained flour (bramaia) for a firm polenta and a finer grained fIour (fioretto) for a soft polenta.
  • Always stir polenta in the same direction (as for mayonnaise, for example).
  • The cooking time for polenta is very important: the longer it is cooked, the more flavorsome and digestible it will become.
  • During the cooking process, air bubbles form inside the mass of polenta, these bubbles cause continuous eruptions, so be very careful that you do not get splashed and scalded.
  • Keep 1 cup (250 ml) of boiling water to hand in case the polenta becomes too thick.
  • You can cook the polenta in a pressure cooker. Once the flour and water are mixed, close the lid and cook for 20 minutes. Turn off the heat and reduce the pressure, then open the lid and stir vigorously before serving or pouring onto a polenta board.
  • To avoid stirring continuously during the cooking process, you can cook the polenta in a bain-marie, but the cooking time will be longer.

Traditional Polenta Cooking Recipe – Polenta tradizionale Recipe

Serves 4-6

  • Preparation time: 10 minutes
  • Cooking time: 45-60 minutes

Ingredients

  • 4 cups (1 liter) water
  • 1 tablespoon (15 g) salt
  • 2 ½ cups (10 oz./300 g) white or yellow polenta flour for firm polenta
    or
  • 1 ½ cups (7 oz./200 g) white or yellow polenta flour for soft polenta

Polenta - Traditional Polenta Cooking Recipe 1

 

Polenta - Traditional Polenta Cooking Recipe 2

Polenta - Traditional Polenta Cooking Recipe 3

Cooking Method

  • Boil the water in a saucepan. Add the salt, then pour in the flour, mixing continuously with a whisk to prevent lumps forming (1).
  • Let simmer for 45 to 60 minutes, stirring continuously (after the initial phase the whisk can be replaced by a wooden spoon) (2).
  • The polenta is cooked once it comes away from the sides of the saucepan and forms a cohesive mass. Spread it onto the polenta board and leave to firm up (3). (White polenta flour has been used in these photographs.)

Shrimp, Zucchini, and Lemon Risotto Cooking Recipe – Risotto Gamberi, Zucchine e Limone Recipe

Shrimp, Zucchini, and Lemon Risotto Cooking Recipe - Risotto Gamberi, Zucchine e Limone Recipe

Shrimp, Zucchini, and Lemon Risotto Cooking Recipe – Risotto Gamberi, Zucchine e Limone Recipe

Serves 4

  • Preparation time: 30 minutes
  • Cooking time: 20 minutes
  • Preparation and cooking time for the stock: 30 minutes

Ingredients

  • 1 ½ cups (10 oz./300 g) raw shrimp
  • 7 oz. (200 g) zucchini
  • 1 onion
  • 1 clove garlic
  • 4 tablespoons (60 ml) olive oil
  • 1 1/3 cups (10 oz./280 g) rice (carnaroli or arborio)
  • Juice and zest of ½ a lemon
  • ½ cup (120 ml) white wine
  • Salt
  • pepper

Shellfish stock

  • Shells and heads of the shrimp
  • 1 stick celery
  • 1 onion
  • 1 carrot
  • A few parsley leaves
  • 1 bay leaf
  • Zest of ¼ of a lemon
  • 1 teaspoon fennel seeds
  • Scant ¼ cup (50 ml) brandy
  • 1 teaspoon (5 g) salt

Shrimp, Zucchini, and Lemon Risotto Cooking Recipe 1

Shrimp, Zucchini, and Lemon Risotto Cooking Recipe 2

Shrimp, Zucchini, and Lemon Risotto Cooking Recipe 3

Cooking Method

Shell the shrimp (1), reserving the shells. Keep the shrimp meat on one side.

Prepare the shellfish stock.

  • Put the shrimp heads and shells in a pan with 6 cups (1.5 liters) of cold water, the celery, onion, carrot, parsley, bay leaf, lemon zest, fennel seeds, brandy, and salt (2). Simmer for 20 minutes, strain, and return to a low heat.

Make the risotto.

  • Wash the zucchini, julienne half of them and chop the rest. Chop the onion and garlic.
  • Soften the onion in a heavy-bottom pan with the olive oil, without coloring it.
  • Once the onion is translucent, add the garlic and the zucchini. Add the lemon juice and zest. One minute later, add the rice.
  • Toast it by vigorously stirring the rice grains around the bottom of the pan.
  • Deglaze with the wine. After evaporation, add the fish stock one ladle at a time (3), without covering the rice completely. Mix well with each addition of stock to distribute it evenly through the rice. Allow a cooking time of 16 to 18 minutes. Season with salt and pepper.
  • Add the zucchini and the shrimp 3 minutes before the end of the cooking time (4). Remove from the heat, let rest for 2 minutes, and then serve immediately.

Chef’s note

  • Generally Parmesan and other dairy products are not added to risotto recipes based on fish, as its delicate flavor can be over-whelmed by the pronounced taste of cheese.

What to do with leftover risotto

You can vary many of the most traditional risotto recipes to use up leftovers, possibly with the addition of extra ingredients.

Rice omelet: just add 1 or 2 beaten eggs and cook in a skillet. You can also add julienne vegetables, slices or pieces of char- cuterie, cheese, etc.

Rice cakes: heat a knob of butter and 1 tablespoon of olive oil in a skillet and add the rice, flattening it down well. Let cook for 5 minutes. Turn over with the help of a plate or lid and cook the other side for a further 5 minutes.

Rice meatballs: add ground meat, a spoonful of flour, and an egg. Shape the meatballs, dip them in bread crumbs, and cook in a skillet.

Suppli or arancini: add an egg to risotto, shape into balls. Slip a teaspoon of tomato sauce or Bolognese sauce into the center with a few cubes of soft cheese (mozzarella, scamorza, fontina, etc.). Close up the balls firmly, dip them in flour, then beaten egg, and lastly in bread crumbs, before frying them (see deep-fried rice balls, p. 418).

Timballo: butter an ovenproof dish and create alternate layers of risotto and cheese and/or tomato sauce or Bolognese sauce. You can also include layers of fresh tomato, charcuterie, ground meat, etc. Finish with a layer of rice, sprinkle with grated Parmesan, and dot with butter. Bake for 30 minutes at 400°F (200°C).

Shrimp, Zucchini, and Lemon Risotto Cooking Recipe 4

Risotto with Sparkling Wine Cooking Recipe – Spring Risotto Cooking Recipe

Risotto with Sparkling Wine Cooking Recipe - Spring Risotto Cooking Recipe

Risotto with Sparkling Wine Cooking Recipe – Risotto Alio Spumante Recipe

Serves 6

  • Preparation time: 20 minutes
  • Cooking time: 20 minutes
  • Preparation and cooking time for the stock: 2 hours 10 minutes

Ingredients

For 8 cups (2 liters) meat, stock

  • 2 lb. (1 kg), approximately, stewing beef or 1 medium chicken
  • 10 cups (2.5 liters) water
  • 1 carrot
  • 1 stick celery
  • 1 onion
  • 1 leek
  • 1 sprig of parsley
  • 1 clove
  • 1 bay leaf

Risotto

  • 2 1/3 cups (1 lb./500 g) rice (carnaroli or arborio)
  • 1 onion (or 4 shallots), chopped
  • 2/3 stick (3 oz./80 g) butter
  • 2 tablespoons olive oil
  • 2 cups (500 ml) Prosecco or spumante wine
  • V3 cup (1 ¾ oz./50 g) grated Parmesan
  • Salt

Risotto with Sparkling Wine Cooking Recipe - Spring Risotto Cooking Recipe 1

Risotto with Sparkling Wine Cooking Recipe - Spring Risotto Cooking Recipe 2

Cooking Method

Prepare the meat, stock.

  • Place the beef or chicken in a pan with 10 cups (2.5 liters) of cold water, the carrot, celery, onion, leek, parsley, clove, bay leaf, and a pinch of salt.
  • Simmer for 2 hours, strain, and return to low heat.

Make the risotto.

  • Soften the onion in a heavy-bottom pan with 4 tablespoons (2 oz./50 g) of the butter and the olive oil, without letting it color.
  • As soon as the onion is translucent, add the rice and toast it (1), by vigorously stirring the grains around the bottom of the pan.
  • Deglaze with 1 ½ cups (375 ml) of the wine (2).
  • Once the alcohol is completely evaporated, add the stock one ladle at a time (3), without covering the rice completely. Stir well with each addition of stock to distribute it evenly through the rice.
  • Allow a cooking time of 16 to 18 minutes. Check the seasoning.
  • Once the rice is cooked, add the rest of the wine.-Mix well. Remove from the heat and let rest for 2 minutes.
  • Stir in the rest of the butter and the Parmesan. Stir again and serve immediately.

Chef’s notes

  • This is a classic, chic risotto recipe. You can make it with all sorts of wines that will lend their particular color and flavor to the risotto.
  • The best-known variation is risotto with Barolo, the delicious Piedmontese red wine.

Spring Risotto Cooking Recipe – Risotto Primavera Recipe

Serves 6

  • Preparation time: 40 minutes
  • Cooking time: 20 minutes
  • Preparation and cooking time for the stock: 50 minutes

Ingredients
Vegetables

  • 16 asparagus spears
  • 2 artichokes
  • 1 leek
  • 1 potato
  • A few sprigs of parsley
  • 5 basil leaves
  • 1 stick celery
  • 2/3 cup (3 ½ oz./100 g) shelled peas
  • ½ stick (2 oz./50 g) butter
  • 2 tablespoons olive oil
  • 1 V3 cups (10 oz./280 g) rice (carnaroli or arborio)
  • 2 cups (500 ml) white wine
  • ½ cup (3-4 oz./100 g) grated Parmesan
  • Salt,
  • pepper

For 4 cups (1 liter) vegetable stock

  • 3 ½ oz. (100 g) Swiss chard
  • 1 carrot
  • 1 stick celery
  • 1 tomato
  • 1 clove garlic
  • 1 onion, peeled and chopped
  • 2 teaspoons (10 g) salt

Risotto with Sparkling Wine Cooking Recipe - Spring Risotto Cooking Recipe 3

Risotto with Sparkling Wine Cooking Recipe - Spring Risotto Cooking Recipe 4

Risotto with Sparkling Wine Cooking Recipe - Spring Risotto Cooking Recipe 5

Cooking Method

Prepare the vegetable stock.

  • Heat 6 cups (1.5 liters) of water in a large saucepan with the Swiss chard, carrot, celery, tomato, garlic, onion, and salt.
  • Simmer for 40 minutes. Strain and replace over low heat.

Prepare the vegetables.

  • Clean the asparagus spears and artichokes. Separate the tips from the asparagus stems. Cut the tips of asparagus in two and slice the stems. Slice the artichokes and leek very thinly.
  • Cut the potato into small dice. Chop the parsley, basil, and celery.
  • Blanch the peas, asparagus, and artichokes by immersing them in salted boiling water: cook the peas for 3 minutes, the asparagus stems and artichokes for 1 minute, and the asparagus tips for 30 seconds.
  • Make sure there is plenty of water and that it does not go off the boil.
  • Drain the vegetables and immerse them in cold water with ice cubes added. Once they have cooled completely, dry them.

Make the risotto.

  • Soften the chopped leek and celery in a heavy-bottom pan with ¼ stick (1 oz./25 g) of the butter and the olive oil, without coloring them (1).
  • Once they are translucent, add the potato cubes and the rice. Toast them, vigorously stirring the rice grains and potato cubes around the bottom of the pan. Deglaze with the wine (2).
  • After evaporation, add the stock one ladle at a time, without covering the rice completely.
  • Mix well with each addition of stock to distribute it evenly through the rice. Add the rest of the vegetables (3).
  • Allow a cooking time of 16 to 18 minutes. Season with salt and pepper. Remove from the heat and let rest for 2 minutes.
  • Stir in the rest of the butter and the Parmesan cheese and mix together gently. Then add the parsley and basil. Serve immediately.

Chef’s note

  • This risotto recipe can be made with different vegetables and herbs that will transmit their flavor and color to it.

Risotto – Advice on Making a Successful Risotto

Risotto - Advice on Making a Successful Risotto

Risotto

The cultivation of rice appears to have been introduced into Italy in the fourteenth century, mainly in the Milan area, where it was a means of exploiting the marshlands.

Today, Italy is the principal European producer of rice, and exports varieties intended for making risotto worldwide. Appear-ing in recipe books dating back to the sixteenth century, risotto became established during the seventeenth century, particularly saffron risotto, always with reference to an original recipe from the North of Italy.

Advice on Making a Successful Risotto

Choice of saucepan

Choose a heavy-bottom pan as it will be a good conductor of heat. The ideal is copper-stainless steel or plain stainless steel. The pan should not be too deep or too wide and should hold the finished risotto without it overflowing (beware, rice increases its volume two and a half times during cooking).

In Italy there are pans designed exclusively for cooking risotto: they have a single handle and a very rounded bottom (see pp. 92-93 and p. 169).

The rice is cooked uncovered, except when resting at the end of the cooking time.

Choice of rice

The choice of rice depends on the length of time the grains can withstand high heat and steam while cooking without falling apart, and on its starch content, the binding agent which gives risotto its creamy character.

Several varieties of rice grown in Italy meet these criteria; they have large grains and a high starch content. These “japonica” varieties are known by the following names: carnaroli (grown primarily in Piedmont), nano vialone (Veneto), and arborio (Po valley). Risotto rice should never be rinsed, as this would remove all the starch.

Allow 2 to 2 % oz. (65 to 80 g) of rice per person, depending on the volume of the other ingredients.

Toasting process and choice of cooking fat

First of all the grains of rice need to be toasted in fat over a steady heat. Using a wooden spoon, stir the grains of rice vigorously around the bottom of the pan to color and heat them evenly. You need just enough cooking fat to coat all the grains of rice equally—no more, no less (% tablespoon/10 g per portion, approximately). Once the grains are very hot and cease sliding across the bottom of the pan, the toasting process is complete.

This step allows the surface of the rice grains to withstand the cooking process better and to release their starch in order to bind with the other ingredients.

The choice of cooking fat (butter, olive oil, or other) is always a matter of debate in Italy. Being a northern Italian dish, rice is more likely to have been cooked in butter originally. Ideally your choice should complement your risotto’s additional ingredients, and may also be guided by your dietary requirements.

Soffritto

Once the fat has melted, and before adding the rice, chopped or sliced vegetables are usually browned in the bottom of the pan. This process is called soffritto.

Traditionally the vegetables selected are onion, carrot, and celery, chopped together, or onion, shallot, leek, garlic, and parsley. The soffritto base should be chosen to complement the other risotto ingredients.

Wine and stock

Once the toasting is completed, the pan is deglazed with alcohol. This will help to dilute the residual juices and give acidity to the finished dish. You can use white or red wine or another alcohol, or vinegar, depending on the risotto’s ingredients.

Once the alcohol has completely evaporated, the stock is added, allowing the real cooking of the risotto to begin. This step is also open to debate: some people add all the stock at once and never stir, others add a little at a time, stirring frequently. These different methods influence the final result. The perfect risotto varies from one region to another, just like the methods for making it, The following is a reliable method: begin by adding 1 or 2 ladles of stock without completely covering the rice. Only add more (1 ladle at a time) when the first addition has almost entirely evaporated.

The choice of stock is also of fundamental importance, since it will permeate the rice with its flavor. A stock made from vegetables, poultry, beef, fish, or shellfish can be used. Some people even opt for a stock of salted water. It can also be worth preparing stock from the trimmings of the ingredients used in the recipe, for example a stock made with asparagus stalks for asparagus risotto, or with the bones from filleting the fish for a fish risotto. The important thing is to consider well in advance what will complement the other ingredients. The use of stock cubes is strictly prohibited when making risotto, unless you want a “stockcube” risotto!

As a general rule for cooking risotto, use twice the volume of liquid to the initial volume of rice. However, this rule can vary depending on the cooking method, the temperature, the amount of stirring, the quality of rice, and the nature of the other ingredients.

Always use hot stock, keeping it simmering in a separate pan throughout the cooking time, and also during the meal, for moistening the risotto again for second helpings.

Time and cooking method

The cooking time varies depending on the rice chosen (see the packet instructions) and the method of cooking. In general 16 to 18 minutes will be the maximum cooking time.

The creaminess of the finished risotto also varies, depending on the techniques used. The more it is stirred, the more the rice will release its starch. Make sure, however, that you do not break the grains of rice by stirring too vigorously at this stage.

Cooking over low heat allows you to stir less often; the grains of rice will be nicely al dente and well separated, but the risotto will be less creamy. If cooking over higher heat, you will need to stir more frequently and the result will be thick and creamy, but the grains may be broken and less well separated. The success of a risotto is a question of balance.

Ingredients

The cooking time of each ingredient depends on when they are added to the rice. Stir in the ingredients that take longest to cook (pumpkin, artichokes, meat, etc.) at the beginning of the cooking process. Those that cook more rapidly (for example, leaf vegetables) or very fast (langoustines, scallops, etc.) should be added midway or toward the end. Ingredients that take a long time to cook may also require precooking. Some ingredients can also be cooked separately and added just before serving.

Whether the ingredients are cut into small or large pieces depends on whether you want them to be integral with the rice or the dominant feature of the recipe.

Mantecatura

The mantecatura is the final stage of preparing risotto and gives it its typical character.

Once the rice is cooked, check the seasoning, and allow the remaining liquid to evaporate. Remove from the heat. Add the butter and stir it in gently.

Add the grated Parmesan or other cheese and mix briefly, making sure you do not break the rice grains, which will by now be very fragile. Traditionally, a slotted spoon is used, as this makes less impact on the grains of rice.

In some regions of Italy, they prefer to serve a more fluid risotto known as all’onda (literally “wavy”). In this case, the butter and cheese will need adding before the rice has absorbed all the liquid. As a general rule, when the mantecatura is completed, the rice should be slightly more liquid than you want to serve it, then left covered to rest for 2 minutes.

Serving

As the saying goes: “Risotto never waits for the guest, it is the guest who waits for the risotto,” which neatly sums it up, because it is a dish that cannot be prepared in advance. Once it has rested for 2 minutes, the risotto should be served immediately, otherwise it will cease to be creamy very quickly and become a compact mass.

It is possible to offer a second helping (though it will never be as good as the first) by adding a little hot stock to the remaining risotto and mixing it in gently.

To achieve the best results, do not attempt to make risotto in large quantities (no more than eight portions at the same time). A restaurant that serves a good risotto is easily recognized: it will state on the menu that, if ordering the risotto, you must expect a wait of around 20 minutes.

To speed up the process, it is possible to prepare all the ingredients in advance, ready to begin cooking the risotto shortly before you wish to serve it.

Gnocchi alla Romana Cooking Recipe – Pumpkin Gnocchi Cooking Recipe

Gnocchi alla Romana Cooking Recipe - Pumpkin Gnocchi Cooking Recipe

Gnocchi alla Romana Cooking Recipe

They might be called gnocchi alia Romana (in the Roman style), but this recipe is widespread throughout Italy. The simplicity of the recipe has contributed to its success. It is a baked gratin of semolina gnocchi that can be prepared in advance.

Serves 6

  • Preparation time: 30 minutes
  • Cooking time: 40 minutes

Ingredients

  • 4 ¼ cups (1 liter) milk
  • 3 cups (8 oz./250 g) medium-fine semolina
  • 2 eggs
  • 5 tablespoons (2 ½ oz./70 g) butter
  • 2/3 cup (4 oz./120 g) grated Parmesan (Parmigiano Reggiano or Grana Padano if possible)
  • Salt

Gnocchi alla Romana Cooking Recipe - Pumpkin Gnocchi Cooking Recipe 1

Gnocchi alla Romana Cooking Recipe - Pumpkin Gnocchi Cooking Recipe 2

Gnocchi alla Romana Cooking Recipe - Pumpkin Gnocchi Cooking Recipe 3Gnocchi alla Romana Cooking Recipe - Pumpkin Gnocchi Cooking Recipe 3 Gnocchi alla Romana Cooking Recipe - Pumpkin Gnocchi Cooking Recipe 4

Cooking Method

  • Preheat the oven to 350°F (180°C).
  • Bring the milk to a boil, add a pinch of salt. Remove the saucepan from the heat and slowly pour in the semolina, whisking well to avoid lumps forming (1). Cook for 10 minutes mixing continuously.
  • Remove from the heat and stir in the eggs, 3 Vz tablespoons (1 % oz./50 g) of the butter (2) and Vs cup (2 Vz oz./70 g) of the Parmesan.
  • Turn out the mixture onto a wet surface (marble is ideal) (3) and spread with a spatula to a thickness of Vz in. (1 cm) (4). Let cool, then cut out rounds using a glass or cookie cutter (5).
  • Butter a baking dish and cover the base with a layer of the rounds (6), interspersed with the cutting-out leftovers. Cover evenly with the rest of the gnocchi, slightly overlapping.
  • Dot with the remaining butter, and sprinkle on the . remaining Parmesan (7). Bake for 30 minutes.
  • Serve very hot.

Chef’s notes

  • You can add vegetable puree to the basic recipe to make colored gnocchi and you can replace the Parmesan with other cheeses (Gorgonzola, for example).
  • You can also put cooked vegetables (asparagus tips) or herbs on the gnocchi before finally sprinkling them with the cheese prior to baking.

Pumpkin Gnocchi Cooking Recipe – Gnocchi di zucca Recipe

Gnocchi can be prepared with different sorts of vegetables: carrots, zucchini, eggplants, etc.

Serves 6

  • Preparation time: 50 minutes
  • Cooking time: 30 minutes

Ingredients

  • 2 lb. (1 kg) pumpkin
  • 2 cups (6 oz./200 g) flour
  • 1 egg
  • 1 stick (4 oz./120 g) butter
  • 2 sage leaves, chopped
  • ½ cup (3 oz./80 g) grated Parmesan
  • Salt

Gnocchi alla Romana Cooking Recipe - Pumpkin Gnocchi Cooking Recipe 5

Gnocchi alla Romana Cooking Recipe - Pumpkin Gnocchi Cooking Recipe 6

Gnocchi alla Romana Cooking Recipe - Pumpkin Gnocchi Cooking Recipe 7

Cooking Method

  • Preheat the oven to 350°F (180°C).
  • Cut the pumpkin into quarters, and roast for approximately 30 minutes. Remove the flesh using a spoon (1) and crush it with a fork.
  • Make a well in the flour and place the pumpkin flesh in the middle with the egg and salt, stir thoroughly until evenly mixed (2).
  • The quantity of flour varies depending on the consistency of the pumpkin. Stop adding it when the dough is firm enough to shape.
  • Shape the gnocchi using two spoons (3, 4) and immerse them in a large quantity of lightly salted boiling water (5). Remove them with a slotted spoon as soon as they rise to the surface.
  • Melt the butter with the sage in a saucepan and add this sauce to the gnocchi, sprinkle with Parmesan, and serve hot.
  • You can replace the Parmesan with grated smoked ricotta or add meat stock to the gnocchi to flavor them.

Did you know?

Pumpkin gnocchi belong mainly to the culinary tradition of Lombardy and Friuli. Every year, the last Friday of the Verona Carnival is led by “Papa Gnocchi,’’ who carries a giant fork topped with gnocchi. This is in honor of Tomasso da Vico, who is said to have donated the ingredients for gnocchi to the starving citizens of Verona after a terrible famine in 1531. Gnocchi is handed out to Veronese citizens at the festival to this day.

Gnocchi alla Romana Cooking Recipe - Pumpkin Gnocchi Cooking Recipe 8

Potato Gnocchi Cooking Recipe – Gnocchi di Patate Recipe

Gnocchi

There are several theories for the origin of the word “gnocchi.” These include a link to nocchio, the Italian name for a knot in wood, and to Knochel, a Middle High German word for knuckle. It may also come from the Lombard knohha, which refers to any spherical dough shape. In the Middle Ages, gnocchi were pre-pared with different semolina flours, water, and eggs. Some, based on bread crumbs, milk, cheese, and ground almonds, were known as zanzarelli. It was only in 1700, with the introduction of the potato to Europe, that potato-based gnocchi became wide-spread. Today the term still covers several variations.

Potato gnocchi are mostly found in the North of Italy and Lazio; in the extreme North, gnocchi are made of bread (canederli), whereas toward the South, they are mainly prepared with flour or wheat semolina. There are many other traditional ways of making gnocchi: from vegetables, fish, corn flour, buckwheat flour, or cheese.

Potato gnocchi

These are the best-known gnocchi. They belong to the traditional cooking of the Veneto, Emilia, and Lazio regions. It is mainly the accompanying sauces that bring variety to gnocchi. Factory- made gnocchi have nothing in common with homemade ones. Prepared by hand with good-quality potatoes, homemade gnocchi are soft, fluffy, and light. The choice of the potato is of prime importance. It must be a dry, floury variety, suitable for making puree, e.g. Russet, King Edward, or Maris Piper. Gnocchi dough should contain the least possible moisture, so cook the potatoes in their skins to prevent them absorbing water.
Finally, it is important to add only a small amount of flour to the potato, otherwise the gnocchi will become solid and indigestible. There are several methods for giving gnocchi the characteristic shape that enables the sauce to cling to them in the best way.

Colored gnocchi

To make colored and/or flavored gnocchi, you can mix different ingredients with the potatoes. Increase the amount of flour a little from 1 to 2 tablespoons (10 to 20 g), depending on the consistency of the vegetables added.

  • Green gnocchi: add 2¾ cups (1 Ib./SOO g) of cooked, well-drained chopped spinach (or nettles) to the basic recipe.
  • Orange gnocchi: add a puree prepared with 2 ¼ cups (12.oz./ 400 g) of cooked, well-drained carrots to the basic recipe.
  • Black gnocchi: add 1¾ tablespoons (25 ml) of cuttlefish ink to the basic recipe.
  • Other variations: you can add saffron, or purees made from beets, chestnuts, plums, etc. to the basic recipe.

Storing fresh gnocchi

To keep homemade gnocchi for a few days, cook them in water, drain, then mix them with a little sunflower oil to prevent them from sticking together.

They can then be kept for 2 days in the refrigerator or 3 months in the freezer. When you wish to serve them, immerse them in boiling water as for fresh gnocchi; they will lose their oil as they reheat. You can also bake them in the oven with a Bolognese sauce and Parmesan {gnocchi pasticciati). In this case, place them directly in a gratin dish and do not add any oil.

Potato Gnocchi Cooking Recipe – Gnocchi di Patate Recipe

Serves 6

  • Preparation time: 1 hour
  • Resting time: 30 minutes
  • Cooking time: 1-2 minutes

Ingredients

  • 1 lb. 5 oz. (600 g) floury potatoes (e.g. Russet, King Edward, Maris Piper)
  • 1 heaping cup (4 oz./120 g), approximately, flour
  • Salt

Potato Gnocchi Cooking Recipe - Gnocchi di Patate Recipe 1

Potato Gnocchi Cooking Recipe - Gnocchi di Patate Recipe 2

Cooking Method

  • Wash the potatoes and cook them unpeeled in salted water.
  • Once cooked, remove the skins and press them through a potato ricer or coarse sieve (1).
  • Let cool, add a pinch of salt and the flour a little at a time. As soon as the dough is firm enough to shape (2), stop adding the flour. The quantity of flour varies according to the quality of the potatoes.
  • Make several long rolls with the dough % in. to 1 in. (2 to 3 cm) in diameter and cut into 2A in. to 1 in. (2 to 3 cm) pieces (3).
  • Flour them lightly. Quickly roll them on a fork (4), on a ribbed, wooden gnocchi shaper (5), or on the back of a Parmesan grater (6), so as to create a small hollow on one side and a well-defined ridge on the other.
  • Roll them lightly again in flour. Arrange them on floured boards or trays (7).
  • Leave to stand for 30 minutes.
  • Drop the gnocchi, one by one, into a large quantity of lightly salted boiling water (too much salt will break up the gnocchi).
  • Lift them out with a slotted spoon as they rise to the surface. Serve with the sauce of your choice: butter and sage tomato and basil, Bolognese, cheese and herb, etc.

Chef’s note

  • A dish of gnocchi without sauce contains fewer than 350 calories.